Your Cellphone Could Cause Cancer

One of the most expensive, extensive, and largest studies to explore the correlations between cancer and cell phones has recently come to an end.

 

The National Toxicology Program revealed their findings from a study that was specifically focused on finding out whether or not there is a link between cancer and cell phone use. So what’s the conclusion?

 

The answer is yes. However, only under specific conditions. The researchers of the National Toxicology Program exposed both mice and rats to high levels of radio frequency for a period of two years, 730 days straight. Each day they were exposed to the radio frequency for an entire nine hours.

 

Following this heavy exposure, 5 to 7 percent of the male rats developed a type of nerve tumor, malignant schwannomas in the hearts.  Another 2 to 3 percent of the male rats tested developed a deadly brain cancer, malignant gliomas. When it came to the control group, none of the rodents developed these conditions.

 

These findings led the researchers to conclude that there is very clear evidence of a link between cell phone use and the specific type of nerve tumor, and some evidence towards a link with brain tumors.

 

The one issue with the study is that it’s been worked on since 1999. So with all due to respect to their many years of dedication and hard work, cell phones of today do not use the same radio frequency.

 

What does this mean for us? Unless you’re using your childhood flip phone, the radio waves your phone is emitting are probably not as capable of penetrating the body.

 

In addition, what the rodents were exposed to is not completely the same kind of radiation that a human cell phone user is exposed to.  Rats were exposed to radio frequency radiation throughout their entire bodies. Humans, on the other hand are exposed to it more more specific areas, closer to where they hold the phone.

 

Even more so, the levels of exposure and durations were much, much longer than what most people experience on a daily basis. Thirty million dollars later, it seems as though this study has left us off where we started – completely unsure of the effects of our cell phones.

 

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