A Deeper Look Into North Korea
carly miller - April 15, 2019
I have loved flowers that fade, Within whose magic tents Rich hues have marriage made With sweet unmemoried scents: A honeymoon delight, A joy of love at sight, That ages in an hour My song be like a flower!.

I have loved airs that die Before their charm is writ Along a liquid sky Trembling to welcome it. Notes, that with pulse of fire Proclaim the spirit's desire, Then die, and are nowhere My song be like an air!.

Die, song, die like a breath, And wither as a bloom; Fear not a flowery death, Dread not an airy tomb! Fly with delight, fly hence! 'Twas thine love's tender sense To feast; now on thy bier Beauty shall shed a tear.

- Robert Bridges

North Korea is considered the most isolated and ruthless country in the world.  Though it is referred to as a “hermit kingdom,” there are some interesting and bizarre facts about this reclusive nation of 25 million people. Sometimes, the news leaked from North Korea seems like it came straight out of a dystopian novel. Read on to discover the true North Korea.

State-Sanctioned Haircuts

 

via Imgur

 

The government controls hairstyles. Interestingly enough, fauxhawks have been banned. An unmarried woman can choose a cut that is short and above-the-shoulders. Men are not allowed to have shaggy hair as it’s a sign of free-thinking and rebellion. The government released a five-part series explaining how to maintain hair that aligns with communist values.

State-Sanctioned Food

 

 

According to the Los Angeles Times, people “eat what they can get.” North Koreans buy food in markets officially sanctioned by the state’s central distribution system as well as illegal “grasshopper markets.”

Three Generation Punishment Law

 

 

Equal parts shocking and ruthless, there is a three generations of punishment rule. If one person is found guilty of a crime they are sent to a prison camp sometimes along with their family members. The subsequent two generations born at the camo remains there indefinitely.

State Assigned Jobs

 

 

Forced labor is just another keg in the wheel of the established system of political repression. Citizens do not have a choice in the job they are assigned to and are not allowed to change jobs. One category includes a group of women called inminban who’s job is to maintain the neighborhood, such as polishing the monuments of their leaders and cleaning roads and train lines.